Thursday, January 11, 2007

Gallery 80808/Vista Studios Website



























I just realized that I wrote all about changing images, biographies, and various pages on the Gallery 80808/Vista Studios website. I forgot, however, to include a link. Here it is: www.gallery80808vistastudios.com



These are some of the images I recently took of individual pieces in the Archeology Project. Each photo is being used in the creation of the catalog. Each piece will shortly have a price. The range varies from $18 for the small spools to $28 for the wrapped-and-stitched nuts&bolts to $35 for a sheet of the "Imaginary Text". The textiles are going from $25 to $175. The paper pieces are from $35 to $125. This is the way I really wanted the Archeology Project. I wanted viewers to explore the contents of the suitcases, touch the pieces, fall in love with a special "treasure", and be able to purchase a "souvenir". I likened the experience to going to Pompeii or the Coliseum in Rome or to Stonehenge and being overwhelmed with the desire to take away a rock or a "relic" or sorts. This is the essence of the installation: discovery of a mysterious "historical" concept and fulfillment of ownership--even if it is a mere trinket. I couldn't be happier than to offer the pieces individually, to see the Archeology Project function as intended, and to create a running, open-ended catalog of the treasures it contained.

The quality of these images isn't the greatest. I've shrunk each down for use in the catalog. Actually, the catalog's images are even smaller, just thumbnails. Generally, I keep most art images at 300 dpi and fairly large. These, however, are rather small, but nice!









2 comments:

Wanda said...

I just spent a long, long time looking at each piece. Again, I repeat, you are the most talented and creative person I have ever met. I want to come and just work with you.....

Susan said...

Hi!
Come anytime! You are always welcome! I cannot say enough about the support such comments give! Yes, in a perfect world the artist creates work, prices work, often signs a binding contract with a gallery, delivers art to the gallery, and doesn't try to undersell their representation. The gallery selects the work to be sold, hangs the show, publicizes the show, designs and mails reception invitations, provides a reception, sells the work, and does the bookkeeping/taxes. For this, they are paid a commission. Generally, the commission is 40% though many galleries are now charging 50%. Either way, it seems fair to me. My mentor, Stephen Chesley, has always told me that galleries are suppose to WORK for their commission. Unfortunately, this isn't happening at this gallery. The only thing the gallery is doing is maintaining their regular hours and providing the reception. They will earn 40% anyway.