Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Epitaph banners go up for "Last Words"


(Above:  Tapps Art Center ... the circular desk area with my epitaph banners hanging from the crown moulding above.  Click on any image in this blog post to enlarge.)

On Sunday afternoon I installed most of the work that makes up my solo show Last Words in the Tapps Art Center.  (I blogged about it HERE.)  Yet, there was one important addition ... the epitaph banners!  These varying lengths of sheer chiffon are free-motion stitched with collected epitaphs.  The phrases alternate.  One phrase faces "front" and the next faces "back".  My original concept was to hang them in a grouping and allow people to wander through the suspended words.  The different sheens and subtle variations of color were meant to reflect the diversity of lives and spirits inhabiting any cemetery.  This is the first time that they've been hung in this unique fashion.  I think it is equally beautiful. 


(Above:  Daniel; Caitlin Bright, the new executive director of the Tapps Art Center; and Tori.)

This presentation was only possible because Daniel scaled the ladder, Caitlin approved the idea, and people like Tori lent a hand!  Thank you ... one and all!


(Above:  Epitaph banners at Tapps Art Center.)

Yesterday was also the day to add the exhibition labels, tweak the show, and turn in the final inventory list.  I snapped several pictures of the epitaph banners because ...


... well ... they look great from below ...


... and from above ...


... and especially when looking from one side straight through to the other!


(Above:  The circular wall at Tapps Art Center on which seven additional Grave Rubbing Art Quilts are hanging.)

They also make a nice way to approach the circular, back wall behind the desk.  This wall is now hung with seven additional art quilts.


(Above:  The side aisle ... looking from the back toward the Main Street entrance.)

Yesterday I also brought a bouquet of slightly charred looking roses.  This arrangement is perfect on the ledge under In God's Care, an art quilt.  Black spray paint provided the appropriate look of "death" ... which is sort of funny because I hadn't even envisioned any of the work for Last Words when initially spraying the bouquet.  Why?  Well, these roses were purchased back in 2006 for the first installation of Blues Chapel.  It is amazing how the objects and props from one installation work wondrously with another body of work!

 
(Above:  Blues Chapel ... in my studio ... in 2006.  The roses and music stand made an appropriate suggestion of a musical altarpiece.  The roses' original red color seemed too bright.  Thus, I lightly sprayed the flowers with black spray paint.  The bouquet has been in storage for the past two or so years!)

A good friend once told me, "Susan, if you collect intuitively, you'll always have what you need!"  I think she's right! 



The curved niche and ledge lead to the side aisle which I forgot to photograph on Sunday.  The photo above is this side aisle ... from the viewpoint of the end wall nearest the Main Street entrance.


(Above:  Side aisle at the Tapps Art Center.)

The opposite wall are the windows and doorways into the individual studios at the Tapps Art Center.


(Above:  The angled wall at the back of the center aisle ... nearest to the circular desk.)

Yesterday I also brought two small pieces for two additional ledges.  This is the wall with The Book of the Dead.  I placed a glass container full of my business cards beside a little piece I made during my experimentation with epoxy.


(Above:  Bat in a Box.)

It is called Bat in a Box.  The lid has a professional engraved plate with the title and the epitaph I wrote for this unfortunate creature:  Fly With Angels.


(Above:  The wall opposite the one with The Book of the Dead.)

On the opposite wall I placed another, older piece called My Mother's Jewels. It was made in 2005 ... before I had a blog, before I took documentation photos, before I'd ever had a solo show or even been in many juried exhibits.  It was the result of a "trade" with a local poet, Melissa Bush (who later posed for one of my Decision Portraits, Argentine Tango Dancer).  Melissa allowed me to select and use several of her poems for single pieces of artwork in exchange for one of my first fiber vessels.  Looking back, I can see the stitches that weave together my own interests.  Even then I was drawn to memory, special tokens left to mark our lives on earth, and especially LAST WORDS!


(Above:  Last Words ... the view of the center aisle from just inside the Main Street entrance.)

I'm ready for tomorrow night ... the reception during "First Thursday".  I promise more photos!  I'm also connecting this post to Nina-Marie's "Off the Wall Fridays", a site for sharing fiber art!

8 comments:

Els said...

What a beautiful exhibit these "Last Words", Susan !
(but, these will surely NOT be your "last words" ;-) !)
Lots of succes and visitors !

Sue Dennis said...

Looks amazing, have a wonderful opening!

Margaret said...

I'm fascinated by the banners -- and the quality of your thread-writing, which is exceptional!

Sharon Rotz said...

What a wonderful exhibit. I wish I could see it in person. Thanks for sharing the photos.

Deborah C. Stearns said...

The exhibit looks fabulous! I wish I could be there in person to see it. Congratulations on the solo show -- hope you have a terrific opening.

Judy Martin said...

Congratulations.
Putting together a solo show is an art event.

this looks very intriguing and accomplished.
xx

Judy Martin said...

Congratulations.
Putting together a solo show is an art event.

this looks very intriguing and accomplished.
xx

Jade Graham said...

The different sheens and subtle variations of color were meant to reflect the diversity of lives and spirits inhabiting any cemetery. This is the first time that they've been hung in this unique fashion. I think it is equally beautiful. banners Chicago